10 Characteristics of a Good School

What do you think of the following 10 characteristics of good schools (according to Bill Ayers, Teaching the Personal and the Political)?

1. A Good School is Lived in the Present Tense

2. A Good School is a Workshop for Inventors

3. A Good School is Fearless

4. A Good School Honors Diversity

5. In a Good School There are High Standards and Expectations for All

6. In a Good School Adults Tell Children the Truth

7. A Good School is an Intimate Community Where Children Find Unconditional Acceptance

8. A Good School is a Thoughtful Place that Honors the Thinking and the work of Teachers and Students

9. A Good School is Simple, Dark, and Deep

10. A Good School is a Place Where People Make a Difference

I’d add that a good school is a place where everyone has opportunities to learn – students, teachers, staff, parents, administrators, etc. – and where learning is valued, where the cultivation of wisdom and reflection is encouraged, and where questioning and curiosity rule the day . . . oh . . . and where laughter and mistakes go hand in hand . . . and where we bring the outside in, where we draw on experts from around the world, and where we encourage self-directed learning . . . thoughtful technology integration is seamless . . . and is about solving real-world problems.

Do you have anything to add or change?

4 thoughts on “10 Characteristics of a Good School

  1. A good school in present times should inculcate values in children apart from academics.
    A place where everyone is a learner:the students, the teachers,the principal and the admin, where learning is encoraged and appreciated.A place which a parent can look upto for his child.

  2. a school is a place where the virtue of learning is based on truth and true experiences of students, teachers, management and the facilitators for a boarder outlook.

  3. Since writing this, I’d add that good schools are places where modern learners get to do – to put their ideas and skills into practice – places where they have ongoing opportunities to demonstrate understanding, to apply what they’ve learned, to do and fail and learn and keep doing and learning without the punitive impact of grades that, because they aggregate, don’t tend to mean much.

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